NuVET Plus is Amazing

NuVET Plus is Amazing
Coupon code 81098 for Auto ship Deal

Monday, January 29

Dog Flu can hit any time of the year.





America's Dogs Have Their Own Flu Battles







                                                              

By Alan Mozes and Health Day
                                       
HealthDay Reporter

Keep away from dog parks if flu is in your state! 


MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While a brutal flu season is felling humans by the score, veterinarians warn that there have also been outbreaks of canine flu in some parts of the United States.
Which dog owners need to worry?
According to Dr. Amy Glaser, director of the Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell University's Animal Health Diagnostic Center, there have been pockets of cases reported in Florida, Kentucky and Tennessee, as well as in southwest Ohio and parts of central coastal California.
Two different strains can strike man's best friend: H3N8, first identified in 2004, and H3N2, which first appeared on the scene in 2015.
"Canine influenza, or dog flu, is a highly contagious respiratory infection of dogs that is caused by an influenza A virus," explained Dr. Michael Topper, president of the American Veterinary Medical Association.
What's more, "almost all dogs exposed to the virus will become infected," although most cases will be mild, Topper said. Dogs can catch it from other dogs, and through contact with contaminated food and water bowls and toys.
Why will most catch it? Dog flu is still "an emerging disease," Topper said, and most dogs in the United States have not been exposed to it.

That means roughly 80 percent of those animals that become infected will develop a flu-like illness, he said.
"Once introduced into a group of dogs [canine flu] spreads quickly," Glaser confirmed. "And it should be expected that all or most dogs will be affected, as most dogs are susceptible to infection."
On a positive note, humans can't catch canine flu, Glaser explained. In fact, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stresses that "no human infections with canine influenza have ever been reported."
And while many cases of dog flu go unreported, canine flu has never broken out on a national scale. According to Glaser, "unlike human influenza, canine influenza outbreaks tend to be highly local, with the intense transmission in defined geographic locations."
So what are the signs a dog has the flu?
"Most dogs infected with canine influenza exhibit signs similar to what we see in people who are sick with the flu," said Topper. Symptoms include coughing, sneezing, a runny nose, lethargy, a fever and/or a reduced appetite.
"Some dogs with influenza may vomit or have diarrhea," Glaser added. "Most dogs will recover, but some may need medication to help prevent secondary bacterial infections that can be serious if untreated."
Said Topper: "In more severe cases, dogs may have a very high fever of 104 to 106 degrees Fahrenheit and clinical signs of pneumonia most likely from a secondary bacterial infection."
But only about 10 percent of infected dogs will die, he said. "For most dogs, the illness is mild, and they recover in two to three weeks," he added.
But infected dogs with canine flu "should be isolated to prevent transmission of the virus to other dogs," said Topper.
Glaser advises keeping flu-ridden dogs separated from other dogs for 21 days.


"The course of treatment depends on the pet's condition," Topper said, "including the presence or absence of a secondary bacterial infection, pneumonia, dehydration or other medical issues such as pregnancy, pre-existing respiratory disease, or a compromised immune system."
In some cases, vets may prescribe antibiotics or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory to reduce fever, swelling and pain. Dehydration may also call for "fluid therapy," while only severe cases tend to require hospitalization.

If your dog has been ill for a few days please call your local Vet for an exam.




Tuesday, January 2

Teaching your Bulldog the Quiet Command




How to Teach your Bulldog the Quiet Word


BHD: How To Teach Your Dog the “Quiet” Command




Ever find yourself getting irritated by your pup’s persistent barking? The ding-dong of the doorbell, a deliveryman stopping by or somebody walking past Fido’s window-front perch are all triggers capable of setting him off. Don’t despair! There is actually something you can do to help alleviate some of your four-legged friend’s barking. It’s called the “quiet” command and it is simple to teach.  In an effort to help you restore some peace and reduce the amount of barking in your home, Better Health for Dogs has put together some step-by-step instructions.
Why do dogs bark?
Dogs bark for many reasons. It’s how they communicate. If your dog is getting what he wants when he barks then he is going to continue to do it. Anything from an afternoon snack to a fun game of chase with his favorite human can get Fido barking. Social barking with other dogs, barking to say hello to humans, attention-getting, alarm, and compulsive barking are all types of barking that you may experience with your pup.  Once you have figured out the trigger then you can move onto teaching your dog how to be quiet with a simple command.
What you will need:
  • Your dog’s favorite treats – something he loves but doesn’t always get like cheese or hot dogs, for example.
  • A little bit of Patience
  • A human volunteer (optional)
There are a couple ways you can proceed; either wait for the next time your dog encounters a barking trigger or employ the help of a friend to walk past your house and get your dog to bark.
Step 1: Allow your pooch to bark a few times then say “quiet.” Don’t yell. Stay calm. Your dog can sense when you are upset. This is where you can ask your friend to help by walking past your dog’s field of vision, by pretending to be a mailman for example and getting Fido to bark.
Step 2: Gently hold your dog’s muzzle closed. Say, “quiet” again. Note: If this seems to upset or makes your dog uncomfortable then do not hold his muzzle ( For an English Bulldog you may want to just put pressure on the muzzle without holding it )  -- apply 2 fingers as pressure~ 
Step 3: Remove your hands from your dog’s muzzle. ( your fingers ) 
Step 4: Walk away from the barking trigger and call your dog to follow.
Step 5: Give him treats and praise.
Step 6: Repeat. Work on this over several days with your pup. You will know that your training has begun to pay off when your dog is quiet when you give the “quiet” command.
Alternate plan – Make some noise!
If you find that your attempts at getting your dog to understand the “quiet” command are not working then you can try to surprise your dog by making a loud or unpleasant sound. A noisemaker, a musical instrument such as a maraca or even an aluminum can filled with coins will work to make a sound your dog will not like.
Step 1: Allow your pooch to bark a few times then say “quiet.” Don’t yell. Stay calm. Your dog can sense when you are upset. This is where you can ask your friend to help by walking past your dog’s field of vision by pretending to be a mailman, for example, and getting Fido to bark.
Step 2: make the unpleasant noise. Your dog should stop barking.
Step 3: Walk away from the barking trigger and call your dog to follow.
Step 4: Give him treats and praise.
Step 5: Repeat. Work on this over several days with your pup. You will know that your training has begun to pay off when your dog is quiet when you give the “quiet” command.
If your pooch persists in barking despite your best and most consistent training efforts, it may be time to seek out the help of a professional dog trainer.

This article is compliments of NuVET Plus, the BEST Doggie Supplement in the USA, 
You want the GREEN bottle, not sold in stores,
HOLISTIC - made in the USA! 





Order here and auto ship to your home.  SAVE 15% with code 81098 and choose the Auto-ship deal every 90 days.  TELL them Pet Nurse Marie sent you.

BETTER YET - CALL in your first order at 1-800-474-7044  (60-day money back guarantee and TASTE guarantee too)  

LESS shedding, No more tear stains, Stop yeasty Ear Infections for good.  And much more check us out at, 

                               
                                    www.nuvet.com/81098